FCSNW2018 English header

Metro Toronto Convention Centre 
255 Front St West, North Building, Toronto Ontario 
June 13-15, 2018 


FULL-DAY SESSION:

HALF-DAY (MORNING) SESSIONS:

HALF-DAY (AFTERNOON) SESSIONS:

 

FULL-DAY SESSION:

Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Contaminated Sites Management

As part of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), the Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) Expert Support Team of FCCS offers a one-day training course on quality assurance and control quality or QA / QC. The objective of this course is to familiarize you with QA / QC concepts with a specific purpose to provide you with the necessary tools to ensure that the environmental data from your contaminated sites assessment and management activities are of high quality. Here are some of the themes that will be addressed:

  • General QA / QC Concepts;
  • Concepts and processes related to
  • QA / QC in the field;
  • Laboratory QA / QC;
  • Report evaluation;
  • Basic principles of data warehousing

Dylan Hemmings, Principal, Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Dylan Hemmings is a principal in Environmental Services based in Ottawa with over 15 years of experience and currently co-manages one of the largest environmental remediation teams in Ontario. Dylan brings a client focused approach to projects and is skilled at integrating Stantec’s environmental services for large multidisciplinary projects. Project experience has included forensic environmental site assessments, remediation and spill response projects, aquatic and terrestrial monitoring programs, reclamation and risk assessment for various contaminants and media. Many of the projects have involved consultation with various levels of government and he has developed an understanding of the standards, criteria and guidelines for provincial and federal environmental regulators. Dylan is also a skilled presenter and has delivered over 10 training workshops or presentations for a variety of audiences, including clients, regulators, First Nations representatives and industry professionals.

Tanya Shanoff, Senior Hydrogeologist, Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Tanya Shanoff is a bilingual Senior Hydrogeologist with 20 years of experience in the fields of contaminated sites assessment and remediation in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. She has experience in a variety of disciplines including environmental site assessment, hydrogeological investigations, organizing and implementing sampling and monitoring programs, site remediation, and risk assessment. She has acted as a Senior Technical Lead and Hydrogeologist on a variety of projects for contaminated sites related to military bases, areas of natural significance, pipeline releases, landfill sites, border crossings, manufacturing sites, highways and sawmill operations. She has experience working with a variety of contaminants of concern including petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, metals, pesticides, herbicides, PFAS/PFOS, chlorinated hydrocarbons, as well as dioxins and furans. She has extensive experience with consultation and working with provincial and federal governments as well as First Nations and Aboriginal groups. She has worked with the federal regulatory framework including evaluating data and developing conceptual site models using CCME, Health Canada, FIGQG as well as risk assessments within the federal regulatory regime. She has worked to provide senior guidance with respect to compiling and assessing environmental data for sites to develop remedial options analyses (ROAs), remedial action plans (RAPs) and risk management measures, supporting human health and ecological risk assessments, and providing public consultation and communication support. In her 20 years in industry, Mrs. Shanoff has provided consulting in support to PSPC, DCC/DND, INAC, and for provincial and federal departments and Crown corporations. 

 

HALF-DAY (MORNING) SESSIONS (x5):

Understanding the Impacts of Confounding Uncertainties with PFAS - from Assessment to Communication with Stakeholders

Per- and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) are a diverse group of compounds that are resistant to transformation in reaction with heat, water, and oil. PFAS are ubiquitous in the environment and in blood samples (based on a study conducted in the United States) as a result of their environmental persistence, coupled with their use in a variety of industries without significant regulation (or only recent regulation). They have been used broadly on federal properties that include airports, military air bases, firefighting training areas/facilities, and research facilities. Because of their use in a broad range of industrial applications and consumer products including carpeting, apparel, upholstery, food paper wrappings, aqueous fire-fighting foams (AFFF), and metal plating, their presence can be confounding if attribution is of importance in a contaminated sites situation. Furthermore, use of these products at high concentrations, such as in off-site historical fire where AFFF was used, could cause plumes of PFAS contaminants to migrate through federal properties, and could impact downgradient potable water wells. With recent low-level human health and soil screening values derived by Health Canada for nine specific PFAS parameters, this emerging class of contaminants is getting a lot of attention.

This course will focus on the challenges PFAS pose for human and ecological health, Canadian screening values in comparison to other international guidelines/regulations, assessment challenges, and remediation options. The course will draw from recent federal and non-federal site challenges and successes in addressing PFAS in the environment based on Stantec’s experience. The case studies will present potential historical confounding sources relating to PFAS use, chemical properties and their effect on environmental fate and transport, sampling and laboratory requirements/limitations, risk assessment, remedial options analysis, and regulatory challenges. Risk communication in the lens of the ever-changing regulatory context and the vast uncertainties surrounding PFAS will also be discussed. The course will summarize the state of academic research and industry/regulatory publications, and provide the student with a broad understanding of the problem and potential solutions.

François Lauzon, C.D., M.Eng., P.Eng., LEED AP BD+C Vice President, Environmental Services, Stantec Consulting Ltd.

Terry Obal, Director, Scientific Services and DevelopmentMaxxam Analytics 

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Management of Working Harbours

**This session will be delivered in French.

The federal government owns and manages water lots in large urban harbours as well as many smaller harbours across Canada. Many of these working harbours are suspected or known to be impacted by historical contamination. While the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) Aquatic Contaminated Sites Framework provides a general approach for addressing all aquatic contaminated sites, the need for supplementary guidance was identified to address the additional challenges associated with the assessment and remediation and/or risk management of working harbours. For example, working harbours integrate physical and chemical inputs from large catchment areas and are often affected by numerous historical and ongoing sources of contamination, from both surrounding land uses and over-water uses. There are frequently multiple property owners and stakeholders that must be considered and included in the process of addressing and managing a site. Finally, working harbour activities are ongoing and consequently there is a need to adopt a practical approach for environmentally sound decision-making that balances socioeconomic considerations with environmental protection.

Dr. Tamsin Laing, Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Militairy College of Canada

Mario Cormier, Environment and Climate Change Canada

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Module 5 – Defining and Using Background Conditions in ERAs

This training was produced by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). FCSAP was developed to support federal departments and agencies to reduce the risks to human health and the environment associated with federal contaminated sites. Under FCSAP, ecological risk assessments (ERAs) are commonly used as a management tool for federal contaminated sites. This training aims at defining background concentrations (natural and ambient) and using these concentrations in an ERA. Understanding of site conditions that are not related to the presence of contaminants of concern is critical to determining the ecotoxicological risk of the site.

The following topics will be discussed:

  • Concepts of natural and ambient background concentrations;
  • Defining natural and ambient background concentrations in various media; and,
  • How to use natural and ambient background concentrations in ERAs for:
    • Identification of contaminants of concern;
    • Exposure Assessment;
    • Toxicity Assessment; and,
    • Risk Characterisation and Remedial Objectives.

Dr. Melissa Whitfield Aslund, Environmental Scientist, Stantec Consulting Ltd. 
Dr. Melissa Whitfield Aslund is an environmental scientist with experience in ecological risk assessment, risk communication, and exploring the application of robust statistical techniques to address environmental issues. She has a Ph.D. in Environmental Science from the Royal Military College of Canada and an undergraduate degree in Math and Biology from Queen’s University. She has authored or co-authored >20 peer-reviewed published research articles as well as a chapter about phytoremediation in a book published as part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series. Dr. Whitfield Aslund has considerable experience preparing pesticide risk assessments under U.S. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Endangered Species Act (ESA) requirements. She has also completed ecological risk assessments for properties contaminated with perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFAS), petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), and other contaminants. With respect to risk communication, she has assisted in the preparation of public meeting materials and has attended open house meetings as a human health effects subject matter expert for various wind and solar development companies. Her statistically based projects have included a statistical analysis of systemic pesticide residues in pollen and nectar collected from field studies, a multivariate statistical evaluation of the relationship between soil properties and ecotoxicity endpoints in weathered PHC contaminated soil, and the application of multivariate statistical techniques to assist in the identification of the most likely source of a soil contamination plume at a property where multiple potential sources had been identified.
 

Dr. Annick St-Amand, Environmental Scientist – Analytical Chemistry, Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Dr. St-Amand is a fluently bilingual scientist working in the areas of human health and ecological risk assessment (HHERA) and Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM). She specializes in the areas of analytical chemistry and environmental modeling, including the development of models for oil spill fate and transport in the marine and freshwater environments. She has modeled and authored human health and ecological risk assessments for both contaminated sites and major proposed developments. Her proficiency in statistical methods and analysis has involved her in a number of projects for which she provides assistance in analysis and interpretation of biological and chemical data.  For the past 10 years, she has collaborated to ERAs for proposed major pipeline projects, which included routine operations, accidental release to the marine environment, and accidental release to the freshwater environment. Responsibilities included development of fate and transport models, coordination of field work and laboratory analysis (products and environmental media), data interpretation, review and QA/QC. Dr. St-Amand was primary author or conducted data quality assessment for more than seventy-five federal DFO lightstation sites, minor shore lights and small craft harbors in remote and/or coastal areas in the Maritimes for PSPC. She also has collaborated on the development of soil to benthic invertebrate uptake factors and ecological Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for use at DFO lightstation sites in Atlantic Canada.

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Introduction to Stakeholder Engagement and Communication: Using Social Methodology to Strengthen Your Relationships with the Public

Navigating the world of social impact assessment and stakeholder collaboration can be difficult, vague, and views can often be polarizing, however, with proper methodology and guidance, meaningful engagement can enhance project outcomes, streamline processes, and create trusting partnerships among stakeholders. Participants will learn the current state of the art methods and processes for conducting meaningful stakeholder engagement with an opportunity to practice using vetted tools.

Engaging public opinion on projects is a large and complicated task. In order to understand the best course of action, practitioners will need to gain an understanding of stakeholder context. There are various complex socio-political and socio-economic barriers to meaningful engagement. Understanding the context of affected stakeholders by the remediation project, practitioners can better collaborate on which method would be most effective for engagement, and how to implement that process.

Through the process of understanding stakeholder context of the site, and through meaningful engagement, a complex remediation project may lead to a revitalization in the community, which may result in an increased perception of urban sustainability, increased tax base for the municipality, gentrification of older neighbourhoods, and improvements in quality of life through ecological restoration.

This course will focus on a broad overview of stakeholder engagement and social methodologies that can help practitioners and proponents in project decision-making. The course will outline the role, purpose, and benefit of stakeholder engagement, touch upon the role of risk perception of impacted community members, and provide engagement planning and societal impact assessment tools. The course will go from background and theory to case studies and testing live tools. Breakout sessions will be comprised of: (1) a walk-through of a community involvement plan; and, (2) hands-on Design Charrette activity to a mock site. 

Most projects require some sort of stakeholder engagement as required by international, federal, state/provincial, and municipal law. Understanding the methods and process that is required for stakeholder engagement, will greatly benefit your project outcomes, ability to tender, and your company’s reputation. This course is applicable to many practitioners and is a great entry-level course for engineers and scientists. No social science background needed.

Reanne Ridsdale, PhD Student, M.A., B.A., Ryerson University
Reanne Ridsdale is a PhD student at Ryerson University, receiving a Ryerson Graduate Fellowship for 2016-2018. Her research will focus on brownfield revitalization and contaminated land management. Reanne completed her Master’s in 2015 from the University of Saskatchewan. Her thesis, titled “Assessing Sustainable Remediation Using Sustainability Discourse,” is focused on how sustainability contributes to sustainable remediation, and its efficacy in decision-making. Her research also included looking at the components of a sustainable framework, which includes robust stakeholder involvement, maintaining intergenerational goals, and achieving a socio-ecological balance. She interned with the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) and received a Mitacs Accelerate Grant during her studies. She assisted with stakeholder engagement and comprehensive community planning intern at Prairie Wild Consulting. She is an active member of SuRF Canada, and co-authored an article with the international SuRF Initiative Team.

Melissa A. Harclerode, PhD, ENV SP, CDM Smith
Dr. Melissa Harclerode is an environmental scientist with an interdisciplinary academic and research background in sustainable remediation and assessments. She specializes in the development and application of integrated assessment approaches to comprehensively define sustainability objectives and evaluate environmental, social, and economic impacts of remedial activities (e.g., technologies and redevelopment). Specifically, she is experienced in life cycle assessment, environmental footprint analysis, cost benefit analysis (CBA), social CBA, risk perception evaluation, and community surveys. In addition, Melissa has twelve years of experience in implementing remedial investigations/feasibility studies, environmental site assessments, vapor intrusion evaluations, Brownfields assessments, and green and sustainable remediation best management practices for federal, state, and private clients. Melissa is also an Institute of Sustainable Infrastructure EnvisionTM Sustainability Professional and a Technical Initiative Lead for the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF).

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Costing of Federal Contaminated Sites

This session addresses costing knowledge gaps identified during the development of the FCSAP Phase III funding proposals. Knowledge gaps will be explained in detail and existing guidance that addresses these gaps will be highlighted. Case studies of different scenarios will be presented to reinforce the concepts presented in the course. This training will be useful for anyone that has or will provide contaminated sites cost estimates for contaminated sites projects.

Michael Billowits, Outcome Consultants



HALF-DAY (AFTERNOON) SESSIONS (x5):

Understanding the Impacts of Confounding Uncertainties with PFAS - from Assessment to Communication with Stakeholders

**This session will be delivered in French.

Per- and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) are a diverse group of compounds that are resistant to transformation in reaction with heat, water, and oil. PFAS are ubiquitous in the environment and in blood samples (based on a study conducted in the United States) as a result of their environmental persistence, coupled with their use in a variety of industries without significant regulation (or only recent regulation). They have been used broadly on federal properties that include airports, military air bases, firefighting training areas/facilities, and research facilities. Because of their use in a broad range of industrial applications and consumer products including carpeting, apparel, upholstery, food paper wrappings, aqueous fire-fighting foams (AFFF), and metal plating, their presence can be confounding if attribution is of importance in a contaminated sites situation. Furthermore, use of these products at high concentrations, such as in off-site historical fire where AFFF was used, could cause plumes of PFAS contaminants to migrate through federal properties, and could impact downgradient potable water wells. With recent low-level human health and soil screening values derived by Health Canada for nine specific PFAS parameters, this emerging class of contaminants is getting a lot of attention.

This course will focus on the challenges PFAS pose for human and ecological health, Canadian screening values in comparison to other international guidelines/regulations, assessment challenges, and remediation options. The course will draw from recent federal and non-federal site challenges and successes in addressing PFAS in the environment based on Stantec’s experience. The case studies will present potential historical confounding sources relating to PFAS use, chemical properties and their effect on environmental fate and transport, sampling and laboratory requirements/limitations, risk assessment, remedial options analysis, and regulatory challenges. Risk communication in the lens of the ever-changing regulatory context and the vast uncertainties surrounding PFAS will also be discussed. The course will summarize the state of academic research and industry/regulatory publications, and provide the student with a broad understanding of the problem and potential solutions.

François Lauzon, C.D., M.Eng., P.Eng., LEED AP BD+C Vice President, Environmental Services, Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Maryse Dubois, Stantec Consulting Ltd. 
Sebastien Brault, Maxxam Analytics

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PFAS Remedial Strategies

Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) pose a significant environmental challenge across Canada due to the widespread use of these chemicals, their persistence in the environment, and low advisory levels or cleanup standards. This course provides an introduction to PFAS uses, site management guidance documents, transport properties, transformation pathways, and site characterization methods including sampling techniques and how to evaluate relative source contributions. Applicable ex-situ and in-situ remediation and risk reduction technologies are discussed. Case studies are used throughout the course to demonstrate key concepts.

A detailed case study is also presented to describe the successful in-situ risk management and remediation of a PFOS and PFOA source zone at an Ontario site, based on the injection of colloidal activated carbon to mitigate flux from the source zone into the groundwater plume. Groundwater modelling is presented as a tool for estimating source mass flux prior to remedy implementation, and for evaluating remedy performance. The range of performance and longevity of colloidal activated carbon for PFAS sites with varying source compositions and concentrations is discussed. Potential adverse effects of co-contaminant remediation on PFAS fate is also demonstrated through other case studies and modelling.

Grant Carey, Ph.D., P.Eng., President, Porewater Solutions
Grant Carey, Ph.D., P.Eng., is President of Porewater Solutions, and specializes in chemical fate and transport, mathematical modeling, and NAPL characterization on projects across Canada and the USA. Grant has a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Guelph, and has developed industry-leading modeling and visualization software. Grant is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Toronto, and is a member of the PFAS Remediation Research Group which is a collaboration between academic and industrial partners. Grant has published or delivered more than 90 technical papers and short courses, and and is currently a member of the ITRC PFAS and In-Situ Remediation Optimization teams

Rick McGregor, M.Sc., MBA, P.Geo., President, InSitu Remediation Services
Rick McGregor, M.Sc., MBA, P.Geo., is the President of InSitu Remediation Services and has over 25 years’ experience in groundwater assessment and remediation. Rick has a M.Sc. in hydrogeology and geochemistry from the University of Waterloo and is a member of the PFAS Remediation Research Group. Rick has published peer-reviewed research papers and has presented at numerous conferences and lectured at universities around the world on the topic of groundwater remediation. Rick designed and implemented the remedial program for the first PFAS site remediated using insitu techniques in North America.

Steve Livingstone, M.Sc., P.Geo., Principal Hydrogeologist and Managing Director, GeoCentric Environmental Inc.
Steve Livingstone, M.Sc., P.Geo., is a Principal Hydrogeologist and Managing Director of GeoCentric Environmental Inc. He serves clients across industry and government sectors with over 29 years of experience managing multifaceted environmental projects requiring innovative and novel approaches. Stephen brings deep expertise managing hydrogeological studies, environmental assessments, preparing remediation action plans, contaminant fate and transport evaluations, computer modeling, complex site remediation, site specific risk assessment projects, brownfield redevelopment, real estate portfolio management, strategic environmental policy and management systems across Canada and internationally. His work has included the assessment, evaluation, risk management and remediation of PFOS/PFOA impacted soil, groundwater, and surface waters at federally owned sites in Canada including arctic environments.

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Health Canada Guidance Updates: What You Need to Know Before You Start Your Next Risk Assessment

Health Canada presents a high level overview of new Health Canada guidance documents published in 2017. This includes supplemental guidance on human health risk assessment of contaminants in Air, Sediment, and Settled Indoor Dust, guidance on how to include oral Bioavailability in a risk assessment, and an update of Health Canada Vapour Intrusion guidance.

Sanya Petrovic, Health Canada
Sanya Petrovic is the Senior Advisor for the Contaminated Sites Division at Health Canada, who has been working as a toxicologist and risk assessor for the last 25 years. She has written numerous multi-media risk assessments, developed toxicity references values for various chemicals, and has provided senior technical review of many risk assessments. Her main focus at Health Canada has been development of guidance and training on various aspects of human health risk assessment, as well as delivery of advice related to federal contaminated sites across the country.

Deanna Lee, Health Canada
Deanna Lee is a risk assessment specialist with Health Canada’s Contaminated Sites Division in BC Region.  Deanna has been with Health Canada for nine years where she is involved in providing expert support to custodial departments under the FCSAP program.  She is involved in the development of Health Canada guidance.  Prior to coming to Health Canada, Deanna has worked in a regulatory capacity in environmental protection at Environment Canada and the BC Ministry of Environment where she was involved in conducting various environmental impact assessment studies in addition to reviewing environmental impact assessments, receiving environment monitoring programs, permit referrals and ecological risk assessments of contaminated sites in BC.

Christine Levicki, Health Canada
Christine Levicki is an Environmental Health Specialist with Health Canada’s Contaminated Sites Division. Christine has been with Health Canada for eight years providing expert support to custodial departments under the FCSAP program.  Her main focus at Health Canada has been the development of human health risk assessment guidance, derivation of soil quality guidelines and the provision of site specific advice related to human health. Prior to coming to Health Canada, Christine worked as a consultant conducting various environmental site assessments and implementing environmental management plans.

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FCSAP Site Closure

This session will provide guidance on the criteria for determining when a federal contaminated site can be closed and an overview of the FCSAP site closure templates that may be used to document and confirm the conditions at the time of closure. Case studies of different scenarios will be presented to reinforce the concepts presented in the course.

Chris Ludwig, Jennifer Kirk and Vijay Kallur
Arcadis Canada Inc. 

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Tier 2 Pathway Specific Screening

The course is designed to strengthen the FCSAP community of practice (CoP) knowledge in applying Tier 2 criteria and help ensure consistency when developing statements of work requesting proposals, to assist with the review of site assessment reports and to make decision for closing lower risk sites (i.e., Class 3 and N sites). The specific objectives of the training are as follow:

  • Provide training on applying Tier 2 screening as part of the site assessment process. The focus will be on federal Tier 2 screening and associated component values, but where applicable discussion of provincial approaches will be provided;
  • Assist FCSAP CoP in identifying pathways, human and ecological receptors and selecting appropriate Tier 2 criteria based on site conditions;
  • Provide an overview of common issues or challenges during the Tier 2 screening process; and,
  • Incorporate an interactive approach to facilitation that includes the use of relevant case studies.

At the end of the course, participants will acquire competencies to 1) identify pathways and receptors and select component values; and, 2) apply Tier 2 pathway specific guidelines and determine if lower risk sites (i.e., Class 3 or N sites) can be closed.

Ruwan Jayasinghe, M.Sc., QPRA, DABT, Senior Toxicologist & Risk Assessor, Golder
Ruwan Jayasinghe is a Senior Risk Assessor and a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology (DABT)-certified Toxicologist with Golder Associates Ltd. in Mississauga, Ontario. With over 17 years of experience in environmental risk assessment and toxicology across Canada, Ruwan has provided his expertise to risk assessments in support of Environmental Assessments, Site-specific Risk Assessments, and Brownfield Risk Assessments for variety of clients in the Oil & Gas, Mining, Commercial, Real Estate, and Power & Energy Sectors, in addition to Federal Risk Assessments in support of several governmental agencies. In Ontario, Ruwan is recognized by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change as a Qualified Person for Risk Assessment (QPRA) and a Qualified Toxicologist. In addition to his consulting expertise, Ruwan’s research has been published in various international peer-reviewed journals and he is an Adjunct Lecturer and a member of the Graduate Faculty at the University of Toronto where he teaching a graduate-level course in Environmental Risk Assessment.